Using Enterprise Library

Feb 7, 2008 at 1:34 PM
Why don't you use the DataAccess Layer of the "patterns & practices Enterprise Library", and other features of this library?
Coordinator
Feb 7, 2008 at 3:05 PM
It was something we considered when the project was initially started but I honestly don't think it gives us anything compelling enough to move the data layer code to it. It wouldn't be too difficult a job, I already have an extensive library of code built upon the EntLib Data Access block that would fit nicely, and using the persistence / tracking provider model it should be a pretty trivial thing to do.

There are other aspects of the EntLib that I'm looking into implementing, in particular the logging and exception management blocks but I think that log4net may be a better option here. Version 4.0 brings us dependency injection that can be integrated with the policy injection block, but again that can already be performed by using Spring.NET or Castle's Windsor.

Is there anything that the EntLib Data Access block or other blocks do that you'd like to see used by WFTools?

Cheers,

Dean

Feb 7, 2008 at 4:08 PM
I think your implementation for DAL is excellent. My problem is that i wrote a 'Workflow Execution Engine' with the help of WF and want to add the tracking and persistence services but used the enterprise library for my other database work. So I decide to rewrite my code and extens your DAL with my modifications. Your code is much better for handling the problems with Guids and Oracle DB than my code.

The Advantage of EntLib is that all blocks, the DAL, Logging, Exception, DepInjection and so on, come from one developer group und works perfektly together. I don't have any experience from creating projects with Spring.Net or log4net.

Unfortunately, I can't use your code without some code changes. The first one is, that i make all your factories for the Accessor or NameResolver classes not static, because my configuration of the database comes not from a configuration file. Other changes depends on my engine architecture.


Cheers,

Stephan